Surgery Clinical Trials

  • Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiation Therapy in Patients With Multiple Ipsilateral Breast Cancer

    RATIONALE: Breast-conserving surgery is a less invasive type of surgery for breast cancer and may have fewer side effects and improve recovery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Giving radiation therapy after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

    PURPOSE: This phase II trial studies how well breast-conserving surgery and radiation therapy work in treating patients with multiple ipsilateral breast cancer

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  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Primary Peritoneal Cancer, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase III clinical trial studies two different dose schedules of paclitaxel to see how well they work in combination with carboplatin with or without bevacizumab in treating patients with stage II, III or IV ovarian epithelial cancer, primary peritoneal cancer, or fallopian tube cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Bevacizumab is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody and blocks tumor growth by stopping the growth of blood vessels that tumors need to grow. It is not yet known whether giving paclitaxel with combination chemotherapy once every three weeks is more effective than giving paclitaxel once a week in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.

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  • Observation or Radiation Therapy and/or Chemotherapy and Second Surgery in Treating Children Who Have Undergone Surgery for Ependymoma

    RATIONALE: Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Giving chemotherapy before surgery may shrink the tumor so that it can be removed during surgery.

    PURPOSE: Phase II trial to determine the effectiveness of specialized radiation therapy either alone or after chemotherapy and second surgery in treating children who have undergone surgery for localized ependymoma.

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  • Levosimendan in Patients With Left Ventricular Systolic Dysfunction Undergoing Cardiac Surgery On Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    A study to evaluate levosimendan compared with placebo in reducing the composite event rate of all-cause death, perioperative MI, need for new dialysis, or use of mechanical assist (IABP, LVAD or ECMO) in subjects with reduced ejection fraction undergoing cardiac surgery on cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB).

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  • Observation, Radiation Therapy, Combination Chemotherapy, and/or Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase III trial is studying observation to see how well a risk based treatment strategy works in patients with soft tissue sarcoma. In the study, patients are assigned to receive surgery +/- radiotherapy +/- chemotherapy depending on their risk of recurrence. Sometimes, after surgery, the tumor may not need additional treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as ifosfamide and doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving chemotherapy and radiation therapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving these treatments after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

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  • Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase III trial is studying surgery followed by combination chemotherapy to see how well it works in treating children with germ cell tumors that are not located in the head. Drugs used in chemotherapy use different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Combining more than one drug, and giving them after surgery, may kill any remaining tumor cells following surgery. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is effective in decreasing the recurrence of childhood germ cell tumors.

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  • Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Tezosentan in Patients With Pre-operative Pulmonary Hypertension, Due to Left Heart Disease, Undergoing Open Heart Surgery

    Endothelin-1 is a powerful substance that may be involved in causing hemodynamic instability (problems related to unstable blood pressure) during and after open heart surgery. Tezosentan is an investigational intravenous drug that blocks the endothelin receptors. This clinical trial will assess the potential benefit of tezosentan compared with placebo in the treatment of patients undergoing open heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Treatment time is from the start of surgery up to 24 hours.

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  • Imaging During Surgery in Diagnosing Patients With Prostate, Bladder, or Kidney Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies imaging during surgery in diagnosing patients with prostate, bladder, or kidney cancer. New diagnostic imaging procedures, may find prostate, bladder, or kidney cancer

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  • Measuring the Amount of Methadone or Morphine in the Blood of Neonates, Infants & Children After Cardiac Surgery.

    Study Population:

    Neonates, infants and children from birth to 5 years of age undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB.

    The use of methadone to provide analgesia may be increasing due to advantages compared to other commonly used opioid analgesic drugs. While efficacy of methadone has been reported in adults, there is a paucity of information in neonates and infants. In the latter population, fentanyl and morphine are most commonly used for opioid analgesia following major surgery, while methadone is frequently used for weaning of opioid dependent and tolerant patients, in spite of the paucity of knowledge of methadone pharmacology in this population. There are several clinical problems associated with fentanyl and morphine, and methadone may offer superior efficacy with fewer side effects than these agents. We propose to study the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of methadone in neonates and infants in the intensive care unit following cardiac surgery.

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  • Aminophylline to Prevent Acute Kidney Injury in Children After Cardiac Surgery

    Children with congenital heart defects often need cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (the "heart-lung machine"). Approximately 35 to 50% of these children will have "acute kidney injury," or damage to the kidneys, after the procedure. We currently have few medications to prevent this kidney injury. The hypothesis of this study is that giving aminophylline after heart surgery can decrease the acute kidney injury.

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  • Evaluation of the Ability to Detect Bowel Gas During Laparoscopic Surgery

    This study will determine the ability of the device to draw a small amount of gas from an insufflated abdomen during laparoscopic surgery and accurately detect if gaseous content from the bowel is present.

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  • Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy and/or Surgery in Treating Young Patients With Adrenocortical Tumor

    This phase III clinical trial is studying how well cisplatin-based chemotherapy and/or surgery works in treating young patients with stage I, stage II, stage III or stage IV adrenocortical cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Giving chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving it after surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery.

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  • Chemotherapy With or Without Trastuzumab After Surgery in Treating Women With Invasive Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III clinical trial studies chemotherapy with or without trastuzumab after surgery to see how well they work in treating women with invasive breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) and giving chemotherapy after surgery may kill more tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with trastuzumab in treating breast cancer.

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  • Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy With or Without Second-Look Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With or Without Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Intracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    RATIONALE: Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop tumor cells from dividing so they stop growing or die. Giving a chemotherapy drug before surgery may shrink the tumor so that it is no longer present by conventional imaging and tumor markers from serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to damage tumor cells. Peripheral stem cell transplantation may allow the doctor to give higher doses of chemotherapy drugs and kill more tumor cells. Combining different types of therapy may kill more tumor cells.

    PURPOSE: This Phase II trial is studying how well neoadjuvant chemotherapy with or without surgery and with or without high dose chemotherapy and peripheral stem cell transplantation, can increase response rates prior to radiation therapy and increase progression free and overall surviving patients with newly diagnosed intracranial germ cell tumors.

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  • Combination Chemotherapy, PEG-Interferon Alfa-2b, and Surgery in Treating Patients With Osteosarcoma

    This randomized phase III trial is studying combination chemotherapy followed by surgery and two different combination chemotherapy regimens with or without PEG-interferon alfa-2b to compare how well they work in treating patients with osteosarcoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Biological therapies, such as PEG-interferon alfa-2b, may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy before surgery may shrink the tumor so it can be removed. Giving combination chemotherapy together with PEG-interferon alfa-2b after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells. It is not yet known whether giving combination therapy together with PEG-interferon alfa-2b is more effective than two different combination chemotherapy regimens alone after surgery in treating osteosarcoma.

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  • Standard or Comprehensive Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Early-Stage Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard or comprehensive radiation therapy in treating patients with early-stage breast cancer who have undergone surgery. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x rays to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether comprehensive radiation therapy is more effective than standard radiation therapy in treating patients with breast cancer

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  • Bevacizumab and Intravenous or Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer, Fallopian Tube Cancer, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies bevacizumab and intravenous (given into a vein) chemotherapy to see how well they work compared with bevacizumab and intraperitoneal (given into the abdominal cavity) chemotherapy in treating patients with stage II-III ovarian epithelial cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving bevacizumab together with intravenous chemotherapy is more effective than giving bevacizumab together with intraperitoneal chemotherapy in treating patients with ovarian epithelial cancer, fallopian tube cancer, or primary peritoneal cancer.

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  • Chemotherapy Toxicity On Quality of Life in Older Patients With Stage I, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal Cavity, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This trial studies the chemotherapy toxicity on quality of life in older patients with stage I, stage II, stage III, or stage IV ovarian epithelial, primary peritoneal cavity, or fallopian tube cancer. Learning about the side effects of chemotherapy in older patients may help doctors plan better ways to treat cancer.

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  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III or Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies carboplatin, paclitaxel, and bevacizumab to see how well they work compared to carboplatin, paclitaxel, and placebo in treating patients with stage III or stage IV ovarian epithelial, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether carboplatin, paclitaxel, and bevacizumab are more effective than carboplatin, paclitaxel, and placebo in treating ovarian epithelial, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.

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  • Inhaled Nitric Oxide and Inhaled Prostacyclin After Cardiac Surgery for Heart Transplant or LVAD Placement

    Research study evaluating the individual and combined effects of inhaled medications, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, on the function of the right heart after surgery for either heart transplant or for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) placement. The investigators hope to learn if these two medications, when given together after surgery, improve right heart function by lowering blood vessel pressures in the lungs. The investigators hope to learn if the combined effects of these two medications are better than either medication used alone. Participants were selected as a possible participant in this study because right heart problems are common during and after surgery for heart transplant and for LVAD placement. In addition, the inhaled medication, nitric oxide, is always given during and after these two types of surgeries at Stanford to help improve how the right heart functions.

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